Think foreplay is only for Lovers? Golfers need to warm up Too…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

“Whoa Sherpa”, I can hear you gasping…”this is a family site, where on Earth are you going with this”, as you rush to cover your children’s eyes.  Unless this is the first post you have read, you know by now that the Sherpa sees golf metaphors in EVERYTHING…

Let me give you some background.

Good Golf (like all enterprises that fill your mind and senses with tactile and cognitive delight) should not be entered into abruptly…without proper “warm up”.

Good golf, rather starts out slowly…in what the Sherpa likes to call “Pre-Round FOURPLAY”…clever huh?

Why?

Like the “oldest past-time known to man”, good Golf requires your body to adjust.  Swinging and aiming at targets at the range before a round gets the blood moving and the muscles properly warmed to deliver the required performance…you know…to play golf…why are you looking at me like that? 

Moving along.

The key here is to feel the swing deeply with your body.  Stop snickering dear reader…I definitely heard snickering. 

Remember, the swing you brought with you is the one you have to play today.  This is “Fourplay”…not practice.  Your smirk is quite noticeable dear reader.

I swear I can hear laughter…lets keep it serious please…the Sherpa has to concentrate.

Now where was I?

Ahh, yes.

The more ready your body is…the better balance you will have between the proper muscle tension and the low level adrenaline you will require to physically deliver results.

Is it just the Sherpa, or is it getting hot in here?

Anyway…your body is not the only thing that needs preparation.

“Good golf”, as the Sherpa has been quoted as saying, “happens between the ears”. 

Good pre-round “fourplay” involves getting your mind focused on the objective of playing golf…namely sending balls to targets.

Good mental “fourplay” raises awareness,  gets you excited, creative and anticipatory about the look, feel and sensations you will bathe in…during your ROUND…what were YOU thinking?

I SWEAR I am STILL talking about golf…sheesh!

Bottom line:  The experience of golf…good golf…starts well before you hit a ball.  If you want to really enjoy it, sneak up on it slowly and the sensations and performance you will experience (during the actual event) will be much more focused and intensified.

The Sherpa needs a cigarette…and a cold shower.

Play on…

The Sherpa

Happiness and the argument for guilt free Golf…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: Common Golf Pitfalls

As the Sherpa gets older some of the truths about golf and life become self evident.  If only the filter by which my conscience evaluates my time on the course were more refined when I was younger, the Sherpa would have been more adept at squeezing every ounce of fun that golf has to offer.

The context for my commentary this evening is the argument which must be made for happiness as an offset to some golfer’s perceived need for guilt at spending time on the golf course (as opposed to spending it in more “pressing and serious matters”)….baloney.

Life, unlike your favorite golf course can only be played once.

So how do we capitalize on the one big “go around”?

Believe it or not, behavioral scientists have actually tried to quantify happiness and isolate its attributes.

They went about it by first isolating “happy” people in polling.   Responders who claimed to be “very happy” were grouped and asked a battery of questions.

The attributes of very happy people were aggregated into three distinct themes.

  1. They had rich and lasting relationships.
  2. They had hobbies that distracted their minds completely…called being “in flow”.
  3. Third they made and kept very deliberate plans to do things that made them happy.

 

The Sherpa has been, unknowingly, practicing quite good happiness hygene.

Mostly because of golf.

Evidence:

  1. The Sherpa very carefully and thoughtfully cultivates and nurtures high value relationships in “golf society”…read my post about my dream fouresome.
  2. Golf completely distracts the Sherpa and keeps me in flow to the exclusion of any other thoughts…pure obsessive joy.
  3. I play golf often because it makes me happy and connects the Sherpa with a source of energy only available in two other areas of my life (Mrs. Sherpa and the Sherpettes).

Unexpected consequence…

If I am selfish with my golf, my home life gets better.  Because I am happy, I am a more focused father, a better husband and a better writer.

Mrs. Sherpa in her wisdom also knows this and encourages guilt free golf, because she wants the one she loves so dearly to have a happy life….and because it makes him a better daddy.

Bottom line: What precious few learn is that every moment that passes leaves us and never returns…except in our memories.

The trick is the memories you create along the way.

Play golf… be happy.

Play on…

The Sherpa

Golf is like a box of Chocolates…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

To be sure, the Sherpa will never be mistaken for the “sharpest knife in the drawer”, but Golf …my beloved game…sometimes makes me feel like “Forrest”.

Today, you see, while getting “beaten like a rented mule” by my favorite golf course, the Sherpa had to gracefully endure the round from hell.

Now, however, I can hardly contain my laughter.

Why? 

Because I was snakebit from the first tee.  I found every hazard and every bad lie on my beloved course and…well…sometimes frustration is just plain funny.

Examples:

  1. On a drivable par 4, I ended up under a tree…on the opposite side of me from the tee box.  The Sherpa figures that: Either the Earth spun backards for a moment,  I hit another tree and ricocheted it back towards me or a squirrel with a sadistic sense of humor set it there so that I would be astounded by how physics had been suspended somehow.
  2. After hitting it just off the fairway (on a par 4) I was forced to hit back out of a hazard.  As you have done a thousand times, the Sherpa also chose a low loft club and made a well committed strike and…pow…I hit the exact edge of the cart path and (miracle of miracles) was able to ricochet it 10 yards backwards, and yes EVEN DEEPER IN THE HAZARD….awesome.
  3. After hitting it just off the green left (on a par 5), it rolled into a hazard.  Again, the Sherpa lined up and committed to a shot out of the hazard.  As I struck my shot, it happily ricocheted off a tree in a beautiful arc backwards and…yes..even more deeply into the junk on my left…whoo, whoo!
  4. After hitting a beautiful bump and run (on a long par 4) my ball was chasing nicely up onto a tucked pin and…pow hit a rake and stopped cold…(insert bad word here).
  5. On a dogleg left, I hit a roping draw…nice and long and just as it reached the turn…the wind vicously shifted and slapped the ball into the water as if swatted out of the sky by the very golf god that I have so dutifully worshipped..why hast thou forsaken me?
  6. On a simple par 3, during my backswing,  my belt buckle came loose and I duck hooked it into the junk on the left…does the Sherpa need  diet?

The littany goes on…but so does my love for the game.

I can hear it now, “Sherpa, have you lost your mind?  You were just treated like a red headed step child and you still love this game?  Do you have self esteem issues or did you not get enough toys as a kid?  What gives?”

The answer is simple…selective memory.

Golf psychologists talk a lot about Golfer’s memories being different from ours.  “The trick”, they say, “is that they forget bad shots, and remember only good ones”.

Good advice, I thought, so I put it to good use. 

Upon even more reflection, lots of good stuff happened too…and not just good shots….I just had to think about it a little.

  1. I made 3 birdies…how awesome is that?
  2. I made a very long putt to save par that had a double breaker and had to hit the exact center to go in…I knew it would go in halfway there.
  3. I made, “G- money” laugh so hard once that he choked on his soda…you shoulda seen it come out his nose.
  4. I thought of an upcoming  post…hint: It will be about putting and “Supa Fly” and I will collaborate on it…he’s gonna do some cool math.
  5. I saw a herd of 14 deer that reminded me of my dad and the times he took me camping as a boy…very good memories.
  6. I learned that “G-money’s” low round in competition was 66…you should see how he hits the ball.
  7. I realized that no matter how frustrated I get, I can keep my cool and be true to all of the lessons I have shared with you…I really sucked it up.
  8. I learned that “Supa Fly”, wants to be a pilot…god help us.

Even as I wrote the list I could not believe all of the recollections of good stuff that happened.  I was certain that I would struggle to find even one redeeming thing about this round.  Even now I am ashamed that I did not recognize all of the cool stuff that was happening.

In hindsight, the list of good far outweighed the bad, and because I value the entire experience, I definitely got my money’s worth today.

Bottom line: For the Sherpa, a round of Golf is a multi layered experience with wonderful subtexts and fellowship that (like a gourmet meal) has many flavors and textures.  The trick is to appreciate all of the flavors and having the awareness and presence of mind to appreciate them as they are unfolding…wow that’s good, I should write that down. 

Maybe next time I will take my own advice more carefully.  I pray that I do.

Play on…

The Sherpa

How scoring an “eagle” can wreck your golf Round…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: Uncategorized

The Sherpa was not always aware of the affect that adrenaline has on sports performance.  Most assume that a little adrenaline would improve physical abilities.  This was certainly true of our ancestors who were avoiding becoming a meal for the neighborhood Saber Toothed Tiger.  The same dear reader is definitely not true in golf.

Alas my adrenaline lesson came several years ago, on the same day that I achieved a golf milestone.

Yes dear reader…on the same day I made my first eagle…it taught me a very difficult insight about myself.

The day was beautiful, by any standard.  The Sherpa was playing golf with his best friend in Vegas.  For years we made the annual trip to play golf, bet on the superbowl and ate way too much red meat. 

By this point, I had never beaten my buddy in a heads up round, and with too much pride on the line, the Sherpa had never asked for strokes.  Instead, I just gave my buddy about 18 bucks every time we played.

Today was gonna be different…

Let me give you some world-famous Sherpa context. 

This is my best friend I am playing with.  If he needs a place to stay or money to pay a bill, I am the “go to Sherpa”.  But I want to crush his skull after he has beaten me out of so much cash.  Odd isn’t it? How you can feel so much kindness for someone, but want to rip their heart out for a $2 carryover skin?  Anyway…I digress.

What my buddy doesn’t know is that the Sherpa has been practicing quite a bit and is looking for some payback.

Terrible golf mind…indeed.  But you get it don’t you?

We agree to play our standard bet:  1$ skins, ties carryover and ties on the 18th hole are settled on the nearby putting green.

I start off strong and am playing “lights out” (for my handicap at the time) and my buddy is having to really lean on his short game to keep up.  He is not long off the tee but can really make the ball “go in the hole”  from anywhere..even from the junk.  He is kind of like Chi Chi Rodriguez without the accent or cool hat.

We are now even for the day and currently on a three hole carrover going into number 14…a long par 5.  For those of you that are unfamiliar with the bet, this means simply that we are tied on money so far and have tied the last three holes.  The competitor who wins this hole (#14)  could win 4 holes total. 

The Sherpa with better length off the tee is licking his chops.  “Oh baby”, I think to myself, ” if I can just make my normal swing, I could really have an advantage here.”

In a very proud moment, I was able to pick out a target, swing smoothly and (just as I made impact) a swirl of warm desert air, as if sent by the beating of a thousand angel wings, carries my ball into the next county….crazy long.

My buddy who was unfazed, because my length had provided little advantage over his uncanny short game, stepped up and hit his stock lazy banana slice into the middle of the fairway.

Special note:  Walking the mile past his ball to get to mine, I admit dear readers…was still pretty darned satisfying.

His next shot is a pretty good layup to his magic number of 100 yards.  To add insult to injury he is deadly from the “hundo” because of the 54 degree wedge that… I GAVE HIM (clearly in a moment of pure insanity).

Again, I gathered my nerves, looked at exactly where I wanted the shot to go and put it 14 feet below the hole. 

Now my nerves are jangling like tin cans in the back of my grandfather’s beat up old Chevy pickup truck.  I cannot believe that I am grabbing my putter after two shots…this is the most amazing feeling.  Even my buddy is now looking at me and obviously wondering to himself…”does he have the stones to hit this putt?”

Every tip…every article I have ever read about putting starts to fill my head like a chorus of violins being played with rusty saw blades.  It is a mess between the Sherpa’s ears and I can’t turn it off. 

My buddy stripes one about 8 feet and..it..is..on.

Now he thinks his birdie putt is going to rattle me and…well..of course it does.

No matter.  The Sherpa uses the time wisely as we approach the green.  Feverishly I try to get myself under control and manage to remember, thankfully, that a two putt is a push and the easy par three is coming up.

With that thought, I get into my routine, set up my ball and prepare to make the stroke.

Some things you never forget…your first bike…your first kiss…your first grade teacher.  I will never forget how that ball looked as it left the putter.

I hit it dead solid in the middle of the putter and it tracked like a frozen rope right at the hole.  Time is now standing still and after what seemed like an hour…

It goes in!

Some celebrations are as memorable as the achievements themselves… I would probably classify this one as the “mother of all celebrations”.  Obnoxious, loud, overly proud and downright comical is how I would detail it.  Adrenaline was running out of every pore and I felt like I could eat steel and spit out nails.

Then I had to play again…Uh Oh!

The Sherpa’s buddy was much more clever than I had given him credit for.  He had already learned the adrenaline lesson and in retrospect, I believe his knowledge drove him to fuel my frenzied celebration, knowing that I would be too hopped up to hit shots for the rest of the round.

He was right…the Sherpa couldn’t steer the cart much less control his swing.

Unaware of the trap that had been set, I strutted up to the tee on number 15 (a cute little par 3 with a water carry about 150 yards out).

Now he is calling the Sherpa, “the Lone Eagle, Eagle Man, Mr. Eagle”, anything to keep my blood coursing.  The Sherpa is eating this up and loving it…

Now comes the shot. 

Warning for those of you with weak constitutions, please skip this next part.

I am over the ball, have no idea where the flag is, thinking about how cool that last putt was and how this must be killing my buddy. I crushed him and I am so much more clever than he is. 

In short…I stopped playing golf.

The adrenaline soaked swing I made that day would blind onlookers, make children cry and force some people to avoid direct eye contact with forever, had they witnessed it.

The outcome was so bad that I still have no idea where that poor ball went, but I am sure it was hiding to avoid being seen with the Sherpa…ever again.

When one is in this state of mind, the badness tends to take on a life of its own.  When the carnage was over and I began to come out of the fog, I became aware that it had taken 8 strokes to finish that par 3.

The subsequent shell shock made it easy for my buddy to win the remaining holes and break even after the Sherpa’s glorious eagle and subsequet spastic rain dance.

I still care deeply about my buddy and admit that I am very glad that he was with me when I traversed this critical crucible of golf awareness.

Bottom line:  In golf, adrenaline kills.  If you hit a great shot, celebrate.  Just don’t  lead a Mardi Gras parade..unless it is the last shot of the day.  If you stop playing golf…you lose.

 

Play on…

The Sherpa

My favorite round of Golf…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

The other day a dear friend (who reads my guidance religiously) asked me a simple question that sent me on a journey of the mind that I did not expect, yet filled me with joy and awareness.

“Sherpa”, he asked  as we walked off the 3rd tee box, “what was your favorite round of golf ever”?

My mind raced back to several rounds of golf that filled me with crystal clarity of memory and sincere peace.

First was the memory of when I broke 80 for the first time with my best friend Steve.  It was a great day.  The wind was up a little and I hit everything I looked at.  I recall finally learning how to hit my short irons well that day.

Next there was the memory of the first time I took my oldest daughter with me to play and ended up carrying her on my back for the final 7 holes while scoring 78.  I remember learning  how calm my mind gets when I have someone I love with me while I play.

Another time, I recalled the joy that I felt when I caddied my brother around a difficult course in Las Vegas to help him break 100 for the first time. I learned how important talking through shots was in order to totally commit on each swing.

Then there was the time that I scored my first eagle.  Again, my best buddy Steve was with me as I rolled in a 10 footer for 3 on a long par 5.  I then promptly shot an 8 on the subsequent par 3.  I learned how excessive celebration can pump you too full of adrenaline and kill your golf swing.

As the memories like this began to rapid fire at a rate that I could no longer process quickly enough, my mind finally began to sort just the themes as they raced by and POW…just like that, it occurred to me.

I know what my favorite round is…It’s the round I am playing right now.

“Sherpa”, I can hear you saying, “how is this profound?  You are just a golf nut…no big secret here”.

Nay dear reader, I am not taking a mental short cut. 

I humbly submit the reason that every round is my favorite is because I learn something every time I play.

If this were not true, the Sherpa would be a fraud…a faker of the highest order.  Truly, I would further argue that to fully enjoy a lifelong love affair with the sacred game you have to give yourself over to the notion that it is a lifelong journey. 

If you cannot enjoy expanding your knowledge and skill unless you score well every time you play, you are setting an expectation that will rob you of your ability to grow as a player and to fully manifest the wonderful trek that golf represents.

Bottom line:  Like a marriage, golf takes work and patience.  Investing in the notion that every round reveals knowledge is the hallmark of a player that never stops developing.  Scoring will come…just let it happen.

I love this game…warts and all.

Play on…

The Sherpa

Why “golf” (not golf Pros) won the Green Jacket this Year…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

The Sherpa loves the Masters tournament like no other. The “reasons list” would fill multiple posts so I will not cover its entire length. Suffice it to say, one main reason I watch is for the amount of information I continue to learn while observing the world’s best players struggle in such a supercharged pressure environment.

I was, therefore, not surprised to see that the “god’s of the mental game” cast more pearls of wisdom this evening.  Sadly, in doing so, they also revealed that golf doesn’t owe anybody anything. If you don’t keep playing golf, you don’t win.

Now I can hear the groans, even from the cheap seats, for writing that last line.  ”Sherpa”, I can hear your pained voices, “did you watch the tournament? They were hitting golf balls and going through their routines…you know “Sherpa stuff”.  How could you possibly say they weren’t playing golf”?

Ahh..dear readers, this is where I think tournament pressure creates the “illusion” of golf, but not the “intent of golf”.

You know the Sherpa loves context so let’s re-visit the well documented “Sherpa” description of golf.

“Golf” is played when you review shots, select them based on factors that will maximize your opportunity to score, filling your mind with a specific target and then sending the ball at the intended target.

What I saw Tiger and Phil doing sometimes fit this bill, but toward the end of the tournament, things changed. I was absolutely amazed when they started spraying it all over the place. I asked myself feverishly…”self, why are they hitting it in the junk and missing 3 footers? These guys have made more money on golf than the GDP of several small countries”.

Technically, they are unequaled. They are ranked number 1 and 2 in world rankings. They have the best coaches, the best equipment, the largest galleries, the best foods/health regimes and (except for the Sherpa) have the hottest wives. Why then are they surprising even themselves with their sudden poor play?  It was like when I found out the truth about Santa. I just couldn’t get my mind around it.

Then I applied my Sherpa frame of reference and re-viewed the recording of the last few holes. It was then that the answer hit me like a ton of bricks…

They stopped playing golf…and started trying to beat each other.

I noticed it the most when Tiger finally gets something going with his late eagle.  After clearing the green, he struts so fast to the next tee box it takes Steve Williams nearly a minute to catch up. When everyone finally gets to the tee box, Tiger is already ready to hit a shot and “put a whuppin” on Phil.  This he does after consulting for a nanosecond with Steve on the shot.  Very “un-Tigerlike”.

When Tiger hastily hits his tee ball, you can practically see his nostrils flare.   He swings so hard, I assumed he broke every lace in his shoes.  Naturally he puts his ball in a difficult lie.  So what does Phil do?  Instead of focusing on hitting the fairway, he succumbs to Tiger’s same adrenaline surge (as if it were match play, and score no longer mattered) and pulls one badly into the junk. 

Awesome TV…terrible strategy for winning a green jacket, and decidedly not “Golf” (by the Sherpa’s unwashed definition).

They both go on to make par so you are probably thinking…”so what Sherpa, they both made par”. That is true, but guess what the leaders were doing?

Making birdies…

By contrast, they (the leaders) were playing golf, shooting at targets and focusing on scoring…not trying to psych out other golfers.

As Tiger and Phil continued their ill fated Kibuki warrior dance (bogies, missed gimmie putts and several tree bruisings), the field kept pulling away and made them irrelevant toward the end of the tournament.

The eventual winner, Angel Cabrera, never quit playing golf and finally outscored two of my favorite golfers…Kenny Perry and Chad Campbell. Kenny, Chad and Angel all deserved to win, but only SCORING wins.  These guys never stopped playing golf , but alas, only one person gets a green jacket.

Bottom line: Even the best in the world sometimes forget to keep playing golf, even while they are in a tournament. If that can happen to Tiger and Phil, you should give yourself a break when it happens to you.  When it occurs, remind yourself to ”play golf” and your scorecard (as well as the trees at your local course) will thank you.

Play on…

The Sherpa

What you can learn watching the Masters…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

Once a year, the Sherpa goes into one track mind mode…to distraction if you will.  Yes, the Masters represents the acme of the most consuming elements of the golf game that envelope me with  a numb sense of wonder and awe. 

Why such prose?  “It’s just another tournament” some might say.  “BLASPHEMY”,  exclaims the Sherpa!

The context is clear…this is the strongest field in golf, probably the most breathtaking course on the planet, advertising is subtle, the tradition is decades old and Bobby Jones (who still owns a record that Tiger has not broken) is credited with it’s original DNA.

It is an event that is so emotionally taxing on players that it sincerely and heartbreakingly brings them to tears.  The desire to win the coveted Green Jacket serves as performance rocket fuel for the very best players on Earth…it gets no better than this…anywhere.

So what does the Sherpa do when he thinks about such grandeur and momentous happenings?  Naturally, I want to give you perspective on how you can profit from what you see, so that you can take it back and apply it to your game.  Just because you aren’t playing in the masters doesn’t mean your game is any less valuable.

So what do we look for this week?

This week I would humbly ask that you watch for the deliberateness of shots being made…specifically one that we all face at least once a round.

The layup.

Why has the Sherpa chosen such a stock shot?  We could have talked about the atomic wedge shots they’ll have to hit onto some of these greens or we could have talked about  how to focus on a part of the fairway for driver…you know “Sherpa stuff”.

The Sherpa has chosen layup, because you will see a lot of them.  If you study how they have set up the graduated rough on Augusta, you will note that in the secondary rough it is almost a crap shoot.  This lie will likely force players to go sideways back onto the fairway (unless they are among the very strong in field…I am talking “muscles strong”, like Tiger).

Even so why am I choosing this shot?  I am doing so dear reader, because the Sherpa believes:

  1. You will face this shot more than once a round.
  2. You can immediately improve performance here, without a swing tip, if you currently struggle when hitting one.
  3. It will cost no money to improve (the Sherpa’s favorite price).

What is the key?  Committment to it…as you would any other shot.

The mistake the Sherpa sees most golfers make when hitting this shot is a mental resignation to hitting a “less satisfying” shot  (when compared with something sexier like…hitting into a narrow green or a tight fairway).  The sense of forward motion tends to keep us engaged while the “low satisfaction” thought of a layup,  by contrast,  is commonly characterized as ”taking your medicine”.

Such negative connotation and mental state, rob us of focus.  Its almost as if we forget that if we screw this shot up it will,  somehow,  not count as much on the scorecard. It is ultimately this line of reasoning that turns bogies into double bogies as we rush to make the “medicine” shot too quickly.  Why?  To get it past us so we can go on to hit more satisfying shots..you know “the fun stuff”.   

The problem is that when you do this you stop playing golf and begin swinging like the nutty professor, foregoing every bit of natural and developed talent you  have so patiently and diligently cultivated.

Next time you are out of position…realize that the scorecard is still interested in you keeping your focus and doing your absolute best with the shot you have in front of you,  whether you are hitting it sideways to get out of the junk or putting for eagle. 

Your layups will have more purpose (fewer spasitc swings) and will get the credit you owe them because of  the clever and aware ”golfer mind” that you represent.

Bottom line:  All shots count…even when they are not sexy.  When you watch the Master’s this week, watch how the Pro’s handle this shot.  You’ll note that they will deliver 100% committment backwards, sideways and toward the pin…every time.  You owe your game the same engagement.

Play on…

The Sherpa

Golf equipment has not made “GOLF” Easier…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

As you have no doubt figured out, the Sherpa prides himself on being positive and generally a “silver cloud” kind of guy. That is the case until I am engaged in a specific argument about the so called easing of Golf’s difficulties because of equipment innovation.

Don’t worry, dear readers the Sherpa is not making up for all his positivity with a tsunami of negative, “golf is hard” sentiment. I am merely saying that even though high MOI drivers make the middle of the fairway more familiar, golf balls go farther and a multitude of other innovations are taking place, handicaps have not appreciably changed.

Why? A key element of golf did not innovate..On Course Advice (AKA the Caddie).

It is no secret that the Sherpa’s definition of golf happens primarily between one’s ears. If it were not so, then getting advice from a “non caddie” during a round would not constitute a penalty. Even the rules of golf address the unfair advantage that on course advice provides.

Think of all of Tiger’s most famous moments. Right before he commits to superhuman execution, he talks it out with Stevie Williams (his caddie), because the more information he can gather, the better shot selection he can make.  Stevie knows all of Tiger’s yardages, all of his common misses (yes even Tiger has these) and can judge Tiger’s energy during a round to guess how it will affect certain shots.

Now superimpose this situation on the typical amatuer game. In our situation, we have no-one helping us out. We are typically unsure of our yardages (in certain cases). We have to keep our own energy up and have to rely on our own knowledge to score. Worst of all, we have a tendency to let our “internal caddie” call us all kinds of bad words when we miss a shot (I will expand on this idea in future blogs).

All of the technology in the world can’t make up for a calm soothing voice, that knows your game, telling you what you need to focus on to hit the right shot.

The dream of having a caddie is only realized for Professionals and insanely wealthy/lucky amateurs who arrange for them in certain circumstances.

Case in point:  A very dear friend in my current foursome called “G-Money” (not his real name nor his persona), who is not insanely wealthy, was given a gift of a caddie once on Bethpage Black. His experience, as you can imagine, was awesome.

G-Money recounts his experience…”I showed up an hour before my tee time and they called my name”. “George, who has caddied for 52 years, greets me and asks, ‘how many bags you want to hit’?”. Not knowing how to respond, G-Money says “do I have time”? George says, “you have time for at least one bag, cause I need to see your game, so I can properly caddie you around this track”.

All the Sherpa could hear at this point was a chorus of angels singing…for I knew that heaven did truly exist somewhere on this earth.

To make things even more idyllic, George next says, “I need to see you hit shots because you pay for a guide, not just a guy to carry your bag”.

You could have knocked the Sherpa over with a two inch putt.

G-Money went on to regale me with the calm and and joy he felt over every shot because, he had such a terrific “Caddie advantage” over his own mind and a very formidable course. In his words “George was better than any club (G-Money) had ever swung”.

Back in the real world we need to overcome this lack of innovation (live Caddying with over 50 years’ experience) with good solid on course strategy and mental game.  The challenge is to develop it in tandem with proper technique and physical conditioning.

Bottom line:  Golf is a wonderful game that you can get good at if you develop your mind as you would your golf swing.  Study it (you mind) like you would a cool new driver.  I will commit to keep writing about it if you will commit to keep reading and working on it as hard as you do your full swing.

Think on…

Your Faithful Sherpa

How to avoid the most dreaded shot in Golf…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: The Mental Golf Game

The Sherpa can hit most shots in golf, based on practice and years of study of this wonderful game.  There is one shot, however, that I learned late that ironically, required no practice and saved me strokes immediately.

To set the context before I share this golfing insight, I want to give the Sherpa a break for not realizing it (this secret) earlier on in my golf journey.  To complicate matters, several times when I faced this shot, I did not even realize I was facing it. 

Confusing? Good, now we are getting somewhere.

Think back now to the last time you played golf.  When you were over the ball and thought, “self, I wonder if I am aimed properly”, then you hit the shot “anyway” (even as you were unsure about the setup for your shot).  Hopefully you were lucky, but you probably had a terrible outcome.

My friend…you have just hit the most dreaded shot in Golf..”The Anyway Shot”.

When you get over this shot..any shot… and are not fully committed you are hitting an “anyway”.  Counting on “anyway” shots are a guarantee to kill your scoring, deteriorate your confidence, and drain the life out of a round. 

This shot is to be avoided at all costs.

Common causes:

1: Poor shot preparation: Getting to the ball and not having the right club, but hitting “anyway” because you don’t want to go back to the cart.

2: Poor focus: Standing over the ball but being distracted and hitting “anyway” because you are embarrassed to restart.

3: Poor strategy: Trying to figure out over the ball what shot you want to hit, and without a target, hitting “anyway” because you have no idea what shot to play.

The bad news:  All of these reasons for an “anyway” can severely restrict the amount of pleasure and success you will have in golf.

The good news: You can avoid this shot immediately without any practice and take strokes off your score.

How?  The next time you play:

1: Don’t take a step toward your ball without making a good estimate of the club you will need to hit your next shot.  Then take two more clubs (one longer and one shorter).  This will enable you to have the right club if you  miscalculate slightly and allow you the confidence that having the right club brings when hitting shots.

2: If you hear noise or see movement while you are standing over the ball, STOP!  Don’t hit that shot. You are not rewarded for being cool enough to hit this “anyway” shot…no one is.  Step away from the shot, politely explain to your playing partner that you need to refocus and go through your routine again.  If you do this you will save more time overall, because you won’t need the extra time to fish it out of the “junk” when you hit the ”anyway” shot.

3: If you are over the ball and you realize, you have not picked a specific shot or even a specific target…DO NOT HIT THE BALL!  WARNING YOU HAVE STOPPED PLAYING GOLF!  Step away from the ball, pick a conservative shot that you are confident you can hit.  Pick a specific target.  Restart your pre shot routine and fill your head with this new shot thought.

Bottom line: If you have the wrong club, a wandering mind and no plan, you aren’t playing golf, nor are you prepared to hit a golf shot.

The Sherpa wants you to be happy and joyous when playing golf.  To do so you have to plan each shot and commit, just as you would for any meaningful enterprise in life.

Play on…

The Sherpa

Why being the “angry golfer” may kill more than your Handicap…

Author: The Golf Sherpa  |  Category: Common Golf Pitfalls

Tool bar below is for Sherpa’s Golf Specific Search (if it is not helpful, tell me and I will remove it).


———————————————————————————————————————————————–The world is a daunting place that drives its humble residents through a vast array of emotions.  Left unchecked, some of those emotions (anger), can damage much more than our ability to play golf.

It is in the spirit of this basic truth, that the Sherpa will finish a thought started in yesterday’s article about picking your “dream” foursome.  In particular, when describing the “toxic” foursome, the Sherpa called out the “Angry” Golfer.

First and foremost the Sherpa is a positive guide, and where possible, a beacon for the path to improvement (regardless of a reader’s emotional predilection).  The Sherpa, therefore, will speak to the Angry Golfer directly today in a sincere effort to help him/her understand how anger affects the game and beyond.

To qualify my opinion, I have done some research to better understand today’s thoughts.

Let me start by making a confession….

I was once an Angry Golfer (albeit on the milder side).  Yes, in his formative years, the Sherpa was once much more susceptible to converting frustration into annoyed anger..which, by the way, is the Golf Gods’ favorite pasttime.  With time, however, and a better understanding of my own mind, I am much better at modulating frustration and the myriad anger triggers we all face each day.  I, therefore, feel well qualified to speak on the subject.

Before we progress, let’s see if we can agree on the premise that incessant or toxic anger affects more than your golf.

Research shows that if you are an Angry Golfer you are more likely to:

  1. Have Higher Cholesterol
  2. Consume More Calories/Be Overweight
  3. Have High Blood Pressure
  4. Have Higher Incidence of Cancer
  5. Be Depressed
  6. Have Fewer Meaningful Social Relationships
  7. Be called out as an Angry Golfer in the Sherpa’s Golf Blog

Being an Angry “anything”, it appears can make your one shot at life a living misery frought with an entire checklist of physical, psychological and social burdens.  The Sherpa finds this tragic.

So how does the Angry Golfer develop?  This is where the research is relatively fragmented. 

  • If you look at psychological research, lack of early childhood bonding with a loving parent creates an early stress response that overdevelops and then makes the anger emotion more difficult to modulate in adulthood.
  • If you look at purely physical/biological research, experts point to an over-active sympathetic nervous system (SNS).  The SNS is the “fight or flight” part of your nervous system (i.e the part that secretes adrenalin and the stress hormone called cortisol).

My opinion, is that each of us is endowed with a certain amount of capability to manage our emotions and, to a certain extent , we can change how we react to frustration.  Research backs my opinion.  In cases,  for instance, when cancer patients were given the option of undergoing normal treatments, or treatment that included anger and stress managment, recovery was significantly better in those who chose the latter.

Since we are only trying to cure golf frustration, our bar is much lower.  Here are some steps you should take:

  1. Accept that anger (especially incessant and unchecked) is likely robbing you of more than your game.
  2. Realize that when you get angry, you secrete vast amounts of adrenaline, robbing you of feel and mental focus.
  3. Note that your behavior will limit your interactions with other golfers, making the problem worse.
  4. Make an effort to understand your anger triggers on the golf course and make a strategy to stop them from escalating. Work on it methodically, like you would putting or your swing.
  5. Learn to meditate.  This one simple skill will connect to awareness of your emotions in a way that robs them of their power over you.
  6. If you find that after focusing on anger management you still struggle with outbursts..get help, life is too short.

Bottom line:  The Sherpa is not a doctor, but honest focus on your anger and its root causes can make a big change in the quality of your game….and life.  If you still can’t get a handle on it, get help.  Life is a gift that can be easily be squandered on misery and isolation.

Play on…happily

The Sherpa